After completing my last exam in my B.A in Psychology, I got on the first plane out of Israel and flew over to London, for a breath of fresh hair, and mainly – for a musical theater field trip. I had carefully  planned ahead so that my flight would leave so close to the completion of my exam, that I would actually have to have my bags with me, and literally take off upon completing the test.

After setting the dramatic atmosphere, I did my best to plan ahead so that I’d do special things in London, making this a memorable trip. So aside from booking tickets for four musicals in three days, I booked an appointment for the Toni&Guy Academy, so that I could get high (west) end hair care, on the morning I arrived. The experience ended up being very relevant for this visit’s purpose – honing my perspectives about being serious about what I do. Cheena, the lovely Korean hair styling apprentice, who was assigned to cut my hair impeccably attended to each hair on my head. It was an audacious experience altogether, since I’ve been cutting my own hair for the past six years, which Cheena wasn’t surprised to hear when she scanned my hair, looking for a way to improve it’s appearance. It was a pleasure to observe Cheena and her colleagues take themselves so seriously (and the bargain in having your hair cut by a supervised student was equally pleasurable), and as I walked out and started roaming the streets of London, many heads started turning around as I walked by. I want to be as good a performer as Cheena is at hair cutting. We share a mutual passion for making the world beautiful and making people happy. Who’d have thunk.

As I arrived at the Adelphi Theater, and took my seat, preparing to watch Kinky Boots, the first musical of this visit, I rubbed my eyes in awe, as the couple who sat next to me on the flight in from Tel Aviv, were sitting right next to me, the evening later at the theater. I remembered my math teacher proving how the odds of having two given classmates share the same birthday was actually quite probable. This made me think of fate, as not just over a year ago I happened to be in Melbourne, Australia when The Lion King was playing, and got to witness this long desired spectacle. I was in town for something totally different, but The Lion Kind stole the show easily. I had felt like I had witnessed a modern day “Mount Sinai” occasion and I had also felt like I had met my destiny – Musical theater. So here I was meeting fate at the theater, once again.

My perspectives on destiny and fate have since been revised: more than I believe in being “chosen” by a talent, I believe in choosing to perfect a given gift – and choosing to make it my life, for now. So meeting the couple from the plane was a nice wink from arbitrary fate, which is apparently – not too improbable.

Kinky Boots has very good intentions as far as carrying a message to the audience about accepting the outcast, in this case a drag queen. The staging is beautiful, the set is brilliant and the costumes, well, are garish and glamorous, serving the message of the show pretty faithfully. I was somewhat disappointed from the concluding number – where the message of accepting yourself and accepting others was chewed – in my face, summarized into these six commandments that the cast members shouted out, as if this were an inauguration of “you – after you’ve seen this show”. I thought the message was so elegantly transmitted till that point.

I was happy to join the audience in a well deserved standing ovation in the end, and on my way home, as I was walking along the Themes, till Fuckingham Palace blocked the promenade and threw me off track, I was thinking about the audiences who come to see musicals in London. People come to this city and expect to see a good show. The expectation of tourist is its own build up, and it seems to me like it doesn’t take that much to amaze an audience expecting to be entertained. They laugh from the simplest man-doing-drag-jokes, they “Awwwwwwe” when they see a cute nine year old portraying young Charlie, they clap and cheer when a dancer does a split or a back hand sprain,  on heels – all well deserved reactions, but still, to my humble opinion – it  seems to me that the audience comes well prepared for this kind of an evening. Conclusively I don’t have anything against this, just feel like something concerning the core of show business was made a little clearer to me – it’s entertainment. Any message you manage to carry across on the way – is a dignified civil service. Maybe that’s what makes Hamilton such a hit – people come expecting to be entertained, but when they exit the theater they can’t help but feel they’ve been lured into the best American history lesson in their lives.

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